A Blast from the Past

Break out that pack of Dunkaroos, and treat yourself to a cold jug of Little Hugs, because the 90s are back.

Teen Nick has been broadcasting popular 90s/early 2000s cartoons and television shows including Rugrats, Drake and Josh, etc. but have only broadcasted them late at night and in the wee hours of the morning. That’s about to change. In September, Nickelodeon announced they will be potentially be releasing a channel dedicated to popular 90s cartoons, which means innocent humor and nostalgia all wrapped up into one network.

Sure, I was born in late September of 2000, so I don’t exactly hold the coveted title of “90s kid,” but I’m pretty excited for this new channel. With an older sister, I’ve seen my fair share of All That, Hey Arnold, and Rugrats.

There’s just something about watching old shows that can brighten anyone’s day. Singing the theme song off key, reciting the characters’ lines because you know them better than you know your locker combination, questioning the fashion trends that you thought were adorable when you were in 2nd grade. It’s addicting.

Russell Hicks, the president of content and development at Nickelodeon, said Nickelodeon is interested in reviving old favorites and bringing them to the television.

“We are looking at our library to bring back ideas, shows that were loved, in a fresh new way,” Hicks said.

The beloved shows that Hicks mentioned are rumored to include Rugrats, Hey Arnold!, Kenan & Kel, Rocko’s Modern Life, and You Can’t Do That on Television. Nickelodeon plans on calling this new channel “The Splat,” and has created a website (thesplat.com) that informs viewers of times when their childhood favorites will be on TV. It looks as if Nickelodeon is serious with their decision to bring back 90s favorites, and they debuted The Splat at last month’s 90s fest in Brooklyn.

Enjoyment aside, I learned a lot from watching these shows. My life lessons included: girls are just as tough as guys (Powerpuff girls), dogs are SOOO much better than cats (Catdog), friends are family (Rugrats), the sight of red sticks and fire means I need to run.

Be sure to tune in, and head outside for a walk down memory lane.

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Church vs. State: Davis Defies the Supreme Court

Love may have won, but Kim Davis refuses to stop fighting.

On June 26, 2015, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of same-sex marriage, legalizing the practice nationwide. Despite the ruling, the nation remained divided on the issue prevalent in the 5-4 ruling.

This Tuesday, same-sex marriage supporters received new opposition: Kentucky’s County Clerk Kim Davis.

Davis, an Apostolic Christian, says she was acting “Under God’s authority” when she decided not to issue a marriage license to any couple; gay or straight. There have been many protests to the ruling, some Christians saying the bible clearly states marriage should be between a man and a woman.

By refusing to issue David Ermold and David Moore a marriage license, Davis blatantly defied the Supreme Court. This encouraged people to speak up and tell her to either carry out the law, or find another job.

While Davis just recently started making headlines, the issue has been ongoing for weeks. Davis has been defiant of the new law from the day it was passed. District Judge David Bunning initially ordered that Davis remain in jail until she agreed to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples but reconsidered, landing Davis a court date for earlier this afternoon.

Davis being a county-clerk had employees under her–one of whom was her son. She ordered the six deputy-clerks to follow her lead and refuse marriage licenses to same-sex couples. When brought before a judge, all of the deputy-clerks said they were afraid of defying Davis, and that they would issue the licenses without further complication–well, all but one of them. Davis’s son Nathan, 21, refused to issue the licenses just as his mom had done before him.

As a result of the many conflicts, on September 3, Kim Davis was found in contempt of the court and was ordered to spend the night in jail. Prosecutors agreed to let Davis off with a fine, but Bunning didn’t think ordering her to pay a fine would be enough, and there was a lesson she needed to learn.

“I myself have genuinely held religious beliefs, but I took an oath,” Bunning said. “Mrs. Davis took an oath. Oaths mean things.”

Religion aside, Kim Davis works for the state. Whether she agrees with the ruling or not, she is required to issue a marriage license to any couple that walks through the door. On June 26, David Ermold and David Moore were granted the right to marry whomever they wanted. On September 1, that right was taken away from them.

LGBT supporters demand equality outside Ashland federal courthouse and Kim Davis’s hearing before Judge Bunning

(Video Credit: KENTUCKY.COM)

#TheDress

#TheDress was trending on Twitter last night, sparking the question “White and Gold?” or “Blue and Black?”

At first glance, I found the poll to be absolutely ridiculous, seeing for myself that it was clearly blue and black, but when I went into school the next day, I realized many people were convinced otherwise.

The rave started after a dress was posted on the internet by a tumblr user going by the name “swiked”.

“Guys please help me – is this dress white and gold, or blue and black? Me and my friends can’t agree and we are freaking the f*** out”

the dress

The post sparked a heated debate on whether the dress was white and gold, or blue and black. Kids in the hallways shouted and pointed at screenshots of the viral photo; even teachers got in on the conversation.

Celebrities tweeted out to their millions of followers informing them of what they thought.

Kim Kardashian West (@KimKardashian) said: “What color is that dress? I see white & gold. Kanye sees black & blue, who is color blind?”

Taylor Swift (@taylorswift13) tweeted out: “I don’t understand this odd dress debate and I feel it’s a trick somehow. I’m confused and scared. PS it’s OBVIOUSLY BLUE AND BLACK”

What do you think? White and gold? Or Blue and Black? Take a poll at thecspn.com!